CATENGESP


A PRICK IN TIME SAVES NINE

(11/02/2007)

Aquest article no estÓ tradu´t al catalÓ; es mostra la seva versiˇ en anglŔs

On Catalan-hating English residents in Catalonia

(CATALONIA TODAY ľ SECTION: LONG-TERM RESIDENT - ARTICLE THIRTY-FIVE)


On the website 'barcelonareporter.com', a Scotsman called Nick recently criticised an English barman in Barcelona who knows Catalan but insists on speaking to local customers in Spanish because, as this barman so robustly puts it: 'it really pisses the little Catalan pricks off'. Nick bemoans the fact that this kind of attitude (reminiscent, I would add, of that of Franco's functionaries in their heyday or ľ if the word 'kaffir' is substituted for 'Catalan' ľ of those chinless officials who made the British Empire what it used to be) is widespread within the more endogamic sector of Catalonia's guiri community.
That won't come as a surprise to anyone who has ever dipped so much as a toe into that chilly social pond. What is notable, however, is that the only British critic of such racism on barcelonareporter.com should be, precisely, a Scot. Scotland has long been a country both canny and surprising and, if all goes well, will soon be springing the biggest surprise of all - political independence, which 52% of Scots now want, according to recent surveys - on a European Union whose most revered ideal, to judge by its actions, is the preservation of the borders of existing sovereign states.
If and when the Scots secede, it will only be a matter of time before the Catalans also manage to free themselves up. Meanwhile, perhaps Nick would be so kind as to send me the name and address of the bar tended by his rancorous English expat. Myself and many other little Catalan-speaking pricks (including certain Italian, Dutch, Moroccan and Peruvian friends of mine) would just love to celebrate Independence Day there, together with its friendly staff. I'm assuming drinks will be on the house.







- Textos i contingut: Matthew Tree - Disseny i programaciˇ: Nac -